Posts Tagged ‘Competition’

The Facts Matter!

July 17, 2010

In a competitive world of 24/7 news channels and realtime online media, getting the story fast seems to trump getting it right. After all, if you can get 2 sources you can always retract latter as more complete information comes along.

And if you’re a big company, then it is reasonable to expect the media to be gunning for you, right? In his article in the National Post today, that is exactly what journalist Matt Hartley says about Apple CEO Steve Jobs’ response to the so called Antennagate story.

Matt suggests that by the use of facts and comparison of the iPhone 4s antenna problem to competitor’s products, Jobs will not win much sympathy and in fact many loose favor of consumers. It seems as if the media feels cheated out of not having brought Apple to its knees and receiving an apology or an embarrassing and expensive product recall.

There seems to be an implication online that upon hearing the complaints as put forward by Gizmodo and other online posts, Apple CEO’s appropriate response should have been to make an immediate apology to customers and investors and recall the entire 3 million iphone 4s. It would seem that according to many bloggers, taking an analytical measured response, like demanding the facts, doing testing and making a decision based on data seems to be the wrong way to go.

Well If the facts that Apple presented are to be believed, it seems that Apple’s iPhone 4 customers seem to be overwhelmingly satisfied with their purchase. And while the reception problem can be reproduced over and over in testing, very few real world complaints are coming forward.

After all, it is exactly because Apple consistently makes product that its customers ( and yes, Fans) want, and address their needs with the highest level of quality user experience, that Apple is no longer the little kid and has taken the dominant industry role.

In my mind, where a company and its CEO take logical steps to acquire the facts and then regardless of the outcome, offer to satisfy customers and refund them, no questions asked if they still are not satisfied, meets the test not only of being a good marketer but also good corporate stewards.

And if that still does not satisfy you, in the words of Jonathan Mann:

“if you don’t want an iPhone 4, don’t buy one, if you bought one and you don’t like it, bring it back”

Bookmark and Share

Is Constant Connectivity Costing You a Bundle?

June 30, 2010

Efficient Use of Time is Essential.

In this competitive age, efficient utilization of resources is essential to stay ahead of the game and there is no resource that is more valuable than our time. Yet with constant connectivity, we are bombarded daily with a barrage of phone calls, email, IM and Social Network notifications that make us feel compelled (or addicted) to respond to in real time.

Time Interrupts are Inefficient.

In addition to the electronic interrupts, there are the constant barrage of impromptu meetings that occur in the office throughout the day. With all these interrupts it is a wonder that we get anything done at all. What is the cost of this lost productivity?

Carve Out Some Time.

It is essential that you set some time aside each day where you can work in a uninterrupted fashion. In my case, this is early in the morning before I get to the office. In his blog posting “Breaking the email addiction” in the Harvard Business Review, Tony Schwartz gives some suggestions on how to wean yourself off the need to constantly stay connected.

Are you able to disconnect regularly? Do you schedule “uninterrupted” time? Let me know.

Bookmark and Share

OMG, Here We Go Again!

June 28, 2010

Leaders are targets for criticism.

Apple’s iPhone 4 hit the stores this week and already controversy permeates the blogesphere surrounding it’s antenna problem. Why is it that people love to write about and read about Apple’s flaws?

Critiques require context and comparison

I have seen many reports about how if you hold the phone in a particular way the signal strength is reduced and how calls get dropped. What I don’t see is a balanced comparison of iPhone 4’s signal strength and calls dropped compared with that of the  HTC Evo 4G and Droid Incredible, the Nexus One ,or a Blackberry Bold. Here’s what a real comparison looks like.

I don’t know if it will turn out that the complaints are isolated or whether Apple will have to fix the antenna by  recall or by software upgrade. What I do know is that once again Apple has a marketing success on its hands (reportedly 1,500,000 sold already) and respected bloggers such as Walt Mossberg say that iPhone 4 is “Top of Class” with the only reason he can’t recommend it is because of the AT&T network.

Bookmark and Share

Apple’s rejection of Flash doesn’t harm competition!

June 18, 2010

I don’t see that Apple is harming competition by their decision to keep flash off the iPad. In doing so Apple clearly recognizes that some consumers may choose to purchase a competitors product as a result of their decision. And some will. There is competition. Consumers can buy a net book, or another companies tablet or they can use a laptop.

Apple is not preventing others from offering competitive products. They have taken no steps to prevent flash videos being accepted on others products or on the web. Nor are they refusing to accept apps if their developers also make versions for Blackberries or Android phones. Consumers continue to have a clear choice. All that Apple is doing is limiting the technologies that may be used used on their platform in an effort to assure an excellent users experience. It would have been very easy for them to allow flash and increase their short sales yet they choose quality and long term gain. I love Apple products because they have great design and an incredible user experience. I do miss the ability to watch Flash videos on my iPad but I knew that when I made the choice to buy an iPad.

I guess there will always be those that like to point our what features Apple products are missing or to assume Apple’s dark conspiracy to take over the world. As for me, I don’t worry about what is missing. I only look at whether a product adds value to me at a reasonable price and gives me quality of experience. What’s your take?

Bookmark and Share